Monday, October 12, 2015

Seth's review of Atlas 1-3 by Isaac Hooke

Synopsis for Atlas:
Rade Galaal enrolls in the hardest military training known to man to become a member of the MOTHs, the most elite fighting unit in the galaxy. MOTHs are tacticians, corpsmen, snipers, astronauts and commandos rolled into one. They also happen to pilot the atomic-powered ATLAS mechs, specialized military hardware that brings new meaning to the phrase "one-man-army." 

When Special Warfare Command orders MOTH Team Seven on a covert operation beyond the furthest reaches of explored space, Rade realizes he's signed up for more than he bargained for...

Synopsis for Atlas 2:
The desperate battle on far-flung Geronimo may have ended in a qualified victory for the elite MOTH soldiers in their devastating, atomic-powered ATLAS mechs…but the cost was a massive one, paid in blood. Rade Galaal, graduate of the toughest military training in the universe, barely survived the terrifying mission in deep space that claimed the lives of the two people he couldn’t afford to lose: a comrade who was more than a brother, and someone who was his whole world.

Lost, broken, and questioning his place as a MOTH and as a man, Rade faces a new crisis when an enemy force—a terrifyingly familiar one—threatens the future of humanity itself. Entering human territory from the depths of uncharted space, this massive alien vessel wears the face of death.

Once the nightmarish invader begins threatening total annihilation, can Rade and his team hope to prevail…or even survive?

Synopsis for Atlas 3:
The ATLAS mechanized battle suits are the pinnacle of military technology, boasting awesome destructive power—but what is behind the armor is only human. Rade Galaal, elite soldier and ATLAS operator, has been tested—and broken—by savage battles and devastating losses. Now, an old enemy poses a new threat.

The vile insectile aliens that once threatened Earth have regrouped to engineer a new apocalyptic assault on mankind, and the ATLAS mechs are called to defend the very survival of the human race.

On the desolate, far-flung moons of Tau Ceti II, there will come a reckoning. Earth’s adversaries are legion, and the planet’s soldiers—for all of their rigorous training and amazing ordnance—are only flesh and blood. But they possess a defiant will to survive. Will Rade find the strength to reforge his shattered spirit and defeat the alien onslaught before all is lost?

(All of the synopsis were taken from Goodreads).

Seth's thoughts on the series as a whole:
Hello again one and all. I have once again read a book for my lovely wife, and as such I am happy to give a review for said book. The one in question for today is a series rather than a single book. It is the Atlas series by Isaac Hooke. I cannot tell you how much I enjoyed this series. I’m pretty sure it was the reason I didn’t sleep for several days in a row. The story starts out small, following Rade, a Dissuader who finds himself quickly down on his luck. Having had enough of his poor lifestyle, he decides to make a go for a new life in America. So, this story seems typical enough right? Small town dude from a south of the border city decides to move to America for a better life right? Well, it’s not as simple as that. America has pretty much turned into a wet dream thought up by Donald Trump. Any non-native born people seeking citizenship have to serve time in the military to gain citizenship, and even then they get treated like crap by most people outside of the military.

Oh, I should probably mention right about now that this series is set in the future. I can’t recall if an exact date is given or not, but humanity has advanced enough that we as a whole have become space faring. We can also use gates, a la Cowboy Bebop, to travel vast distances. So, the human race has spread to the stars. What does this have to do with Rade? Well, he gets to choose which branch he would like to serve. He just so happens to pick the hardest branch available. The Moths.

What are the Moths? Imagine Navy Seals, but Navy Seals that have been concentrated to the levels of badassdom that would happen if Chuck Norris and Bruce Lee were able to have children, and then those children were strapped into giant mechanical suits of armor. That, in short is what a Moth is.

I could go on and on about the story and all that, but you probably want to know: is it worth the read? The simple answer to this question is yes. The long answer is composed of several questions. Do you like action? Do you like sci-fi? Do you like space operas? Do you like reading stories about how underdogs struggle and eventually redeem themselves in the eyes of themselves? If you answered yes to any of these questions, chances are you will enjoy reading this series.

Seth gives the Atlas series: 4.5/5.

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I received these books from the publisher, via NetGalley, in exchange for an honest review. Neither Seth nor I were compensated in any way for this review.

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